Entertainment, Music

Common Misconceptions on Music Students/Music Practitioners

Hello guys! How are you doing? Just a few days to go before Christmas and here’s to more performance and entrepreneurial sidelines. However, despite the existence of sidelines for mostly music students, people still assume that there are little to no opportunities for music students. People often assumed that studying music is THAT easy.

“Puro kanta at tugtog lang naman kayong mga music major eh.”

This is one big misconception against music students. During my undergraduate studies in UP, Music Theory was one of our make or break subjects. Since it garnered 5 units, flunking Music Theory causes a major delay in our music studies. Another major element is that we also have Music Literature classes to help us understand whatever piece we perform, in terms of historical value. Not to mention, in my musicology classes, we do a critical analysis of (almost) all of the musical pieces we encounter. Not to mention, pop is even included, with Simon Frith as one of the most notable pop musicologists. We also do field research in studying every music community, be it classical, indigenous, or even pop!

“Wala namang pera sa pagiging musiko/pag-aaral ng music.”

THINK AGAIN. There are a lot of people from the music industry who are formally schooled in music, whether in UP, UST, PWU, CSB, or even MINT. Apart from National Artist Ryan Cayabyab, some of the notable people from the music industry who actually studied music in college are veteran music arranger Homer Flores, Jona, Moira dela Torre, Froilan Canlas (Tawag ng Tanghalan’s “Songsmith”-slash-vocal coach), Gerphil Flores (Yup! David Foster’s Golden Girl.), Louie Ocampo (He even graduated from Berklee!), Jerrold Tarog (Yes! The man behind the films “Heneral Luna” and “Goyo.”), Armi Millare of UDD, and many more. Most of the session band musicians (e.g., TNT Band, The Arrangers) in major TV networks even studied music in college. Wedding and bar musicians even earn from performing. Most sound engineers also earn a huge sum of money, due to numerous recording projects.

These are just two of major misconceptions on music students and music practitioners. There are actually more. To my dear friends who study music and/or have a music-related job, feel free to leave a comment. 🙂

 

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Entertainment, Field Work, Music, Urban Ethnomusicology

Post-Thesis Thoughts

How are you all? My sincerest apologies for not blogging lately as I have been occupied with several school work. But I guess everybody’s doing fine at the moment. 🙂

Whew! Just a few weeks away and my thesis is now ready for bookbinding, after several weeks of coffee overdose, binge-eating episodes, and night owl sessions until around 2:30 am or 3am the next day. Yaaaaaszt! I was in tears yesterday because I did not expect to have it finished before the finals week has started. I just spread the good news to my past interviewees and they were all glad to hear about it. Thank you for sharing your time and ideas folks! Hope I will be able to catch up with you all and watch your gigs soon.

Setting all these drama aside, how was I able to complete a hundred-page publication in this short period of time? It’s all about planning smart (both as an adjective and Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-bound).

I started looking for gigs through Facebook last January while I started doing participant observation activities in various gigs for February. I decided to hold these observation activities for the month of February because Valentine concerts are quite numerous. For the month of January, I have also looked for relevant literature to strengthen my discussion further. Interviews are also done through various means (e.g., personal appointments, Facebook Messenger, e-mail) within this period.

Speaking of participant observation, I also had to make sure that this is not the perfect time for fangirling to make things less biased. This is rather a time to document data (both stills and videos) for representation and jot down important details, which later became my basis for my interview questions.

I spent the whole part of March for writing. I have established a goal to finish everything before Holy Week break to allow myself to breathe, to relax, and to reflect. I was able to receive my corrected drafts around April so I spent the entire month of April for revisions. I have even declined several invitations to allow myself to focus.

On a side note, I have also asked for my peers’ advice on how to compose myself and set limitations.

Now is the month of May-ing (pun intended) and finishing touches and voila! #GRAD-WAITING status and a few tasks away in my other subjects. 🙂

 

 

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