Entertainment, Music

Common Misconceptions on Music Students/Music Practitioners

Hello guys! How are you doing? Just a few days to go before Christmas and here’s to more performance and entrepreneurial sidelines. However, despite the existence of sidelines for mostly music students, people still assume that there are little to no opportunities for music students. People often assumed that studying music is THAT easy.

“Puro kanta at tugtog lang naman kayong mga music major eh.”

This is one big misconception against music students. During my undergraduate studies in UP, Music Theory was one of our make or break subjects. Since it garnered 5 units, flunking Music Theory causes a major delay in our music studies. Another major element is that we also have Music Literature classes to help us understand whatever piece we perform, in terms of historical value. Not to mention, in my musicology classes, we do a critical analysis of (almost) all of the musical pieces we encounter. Not to mention, pop is even included, with Simon Frith as one of the most notable pop musicologists. We also do field research in studying every music community, be it classical, indigenous, or even pop!

“Wala namang pera sa pagiging musiko/pag-aaral ng music.”

THINK AGAIN. There are a lot of people from the music industry who are formally schooled in music, whether in UP, UST, PWU, CSB, or even MINT. Apart from National Artist Ryan Cayabyab, some of the notable people from the music industry who actually studied music in college are veteran music arranger Homer Flores, Jona, Moira dela Torre, Froilan Canlas (Tawag ng Tanghalan’s “Songsmith”-slash-vocal coach), Gerphil Flores (Yup! David Foster’s Golden Girl.), Louie Ocampo (He even graduated from Berklee!), Jerrold Tarog (Yes! The man behind the films “Heneral Luna” and “Goyo.”), Armi Millare of UDD, and many more. Most of the session band musicians (e.g., TNT Band, The Arrangers) in major TV networks even studied music in college. Wedding and bar musicians even earn from performing. Most sound engineers also earn a huge sum of money, due to numerous recording projects.

These are just two of major misconceptions on music students and music practitioners. There are actually more. To my dear friends who study music and/or have a music-related job, feel free to leave a comment. 🙂

 

Advertisements
Standard
Music

THE BIG THREE SONGWRITING COMPETITIONS: Philpop, Himig Handog, and ASOP

The season for songwriting competitions has come once again! Weeks ago, Himig Handog has already released its top ten song entries while Philpop has released its top 30 songs. As for ASOP, weekly eliminations are being held since December 2018.

With all of these updates, how does each songwriting competition differ from the other?

1. PHILPOP

The Philippine Popular Music Festival, more known as PHILPOP, is a project of the Philpop Music Fest Foundation established in 2012. It is a songwriting competition inspired by the defunct Metro Manila Popular Music Festival, more known as Metropop, where Philpop executive director Ryan Cayabyab became one of the winners with his entry, Kay Ganda ng Ating Musika. In 2012, the songs used to be released under Ivory Music and Video but 2013 and 2014 entries were under Universal Records. It was in 2015 up to the present when the songs were released under Viva Records.

Some of the songs from this competition that became major hits were the following: “Dati” (written by Thyro Alfaro and Yumi Lacsamana; interpreted by Sam Concepcion and Tippy Dos Santos), “Triangulo” (also by Alfaro and Lacsamana), and “Di Na Muli” (written by Jazz Nicolas and Wally Acolola; interpreted by Itchyworms and remade by Janine Teñoso).

Here are the top 30 songs for PHILPOP 2018:

2. Himig Handog P-Pop Love Songs

Himig Handog is a songwriting competition operated by media conglomerate ABS-CBN and its affiliate record label, Star Music (formerly known as Star Records). It was first held in the year 2000 as “Himig Handog Para Sa Bayaning Pilipino” where the song entries were pertinent to heroism, such as Arnel De Pano’s “Lipad ng Pangarap” (interpreted by Dessa), Trina Belamide’s “Para Sa’yo” (interpreted by Dianne dela Fuente and the Bataoke Kids). In the year 2001, the competition’s theme was geared towards the youth, where it was known as “JAM: Himig Handog Sa Makabagong Kabataan.”

It was only in the year 2002 when the said songwriting competition fully focused on love songs. Some of the songs that rose to fame from this competition were the following: Angelo Villegas and Allan Feliciano’s “This Guy’s In Love With You, Pare” (interpreted by Parokya ni Edgar frontman Chito Miranda), Gigi and Ronaldo Cordero’s “Hanggang” (interpreted by Wency Cornejo), Soc Vilanueva’s “Kung Ako Na Lang Sana” (interpreted by Bituin Escalante, Jungee Marcelo’s “Nasa Iyo Na Ang Lahat” (interpreted by singer-actor Daniel Padilla), Jovinor Tan’s “Anong Nangyari Sa Ating Dalawa?” (interpreted by Ice Seguerra), Francis Louis Salazar’s “Akin Ka Na Lang” (interpreted by Morissette Amon), Edwin Marollano’s “Mahal Ko O Mahal Ako” (interpreted by KZ Tandingan), Jovinor Tan’s “Pare, Mahal Mo Raw Ako” (interpreted by Michael Pangilinan), Meljohn Magno’s “Simpleng Tulad Mo” (also interpreted by Padilla), and Libertine Amistoso’s “Titibo-Tibo” (interpreted by Moira dela Torre).

For this year, here are the top 10 finalists.

3. A Song of Praise (ASOP)

A Song of Praise, more known as ASOP, is a songwriting competition conceptualized by Eliserio Soriano (of Ang Dating Daan) and Daniel Razon. While PHILPOP and Himig Handog focused on showcasing newer materials for the popular music scene, ASOP is geared towards religious and inspirational songs. (Think of Hillsongs and 2000s Jamie Rivera.)

Standard